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  • port of Lorient: -Keroman-
    France
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0240187.jpg
    The arrival quays for fishing boats in the Port of Lorient -Keroman'.
  • port of Lorient: -Keroman-
    France
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0240188.jpg
    A trawler - Cap Finistère - returning to the port of Lorient after fishing in the English zone.
  • port of Lorient: -Keroman-
    France
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0240189.jpg
    An employee of the port of Lorient prepares the fish for sale at auction.
  • port of Lorient: -Keroman-
    France
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0240190.jpg
    auction room (La criée) in the port of Lorient -Keroman'.
  • port of Lorient: -Keroman-
    France
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0240191.jpg
    an employee from the port of Lorient checks the fish for transport to points of sale in France and Europe.
  • port of Lorient: -Keroman-
    France
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0240192.jpg
    A trawler has just returned from fishing in the port of Lorient.
  • port of Lorient: -Keroman-
    France
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0240193.jpg
    A trawler -Cap Finistère- returning to the port of Lorient after fishing in the English zone.
  • port of Lorient: -Keroman-
    France
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0240194.jpg
    The gillnetter in the port of lorient is a fishing vessel practising a dormant art.
  • port of Lorient: -Keroman-
    France
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0240195.jpg
    The fishing port of Keroman, in Lorient, where half of the fish landed come from British waters.
  • port of Lorient: -Keroman-
    France
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0240196.jpg
    Quay of the fishing port in Lorient.
  • port of Lorient: -Keroman-
    France
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0240197.jpg
    Fishing boats moored along the quay at the fishing port of Lorient.
  • port of Lorient: -Keroman-
    France
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0240198.jpg
    quays of the fishing port of Lorient.
  • port of Lorient: -Keroman-
    France
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0240199.jpg
    A trawler being repaired in the port of Lorient.
  • port of Lorient: -Keroman-
    France
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0240200.jpg
    A gillnetter comes back from fishing in the bay of Lorient
  • port of Lorient: -Keroman-
    France
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0240201.jpg
    Memorial to the fishermen who died at sea near the port of Lorient.
  • port of Lorient: -Keroman-
    France
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0240202.jpg
    A trawler returning to the port of Lorient after fishing in the English zone.
  • port of Lorient: -Keroman-
    France
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0240203.jpg
    Port of Lorient.
  • “We fish with the hope of better days”: the galley
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0230179.jpg
    A dozen large canoes are usually parked in front of Hann's export wharf, but the coronavirus has slowed intensive fishing and factories that sort, package and send fish to Europe and Asia have temporarily closed.
    Over 17% of Senegalese people make a living from fishing. Since the slowdown in world air traffic, the export sector has slowed down: the best fish, reserved for the European and Asian markets, are sold on the local market. On one of Dakar's major fishing docks, fishermen and retailers are suffering the consequences of the surplus of fish and the measures implemented by the Senegalese government to fight against the coronavirus.
  • “We fish with the hope of better days”: the galley
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0230180.jpg
    A man repairs his pirogue transformed into a fishing boat on the beach of Hann
    Over 17% of Senegalese people make a living from fishing. Since the slowdown in world air traffic, the export sector has slowed down: the best fish, reserved for the European and Asian markets, are sold on the local market. On one of Dakar's major fishing docks, fishermen and retailers are suffering the consequences of the surplus of fish and the measures implemented by the Senegalese government to fight against the coronavirus.
  • “We fish with the hope of better days”: the galley
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0230181.jpg
    Hann Beach.
    Over 17% of Senegalese people make a living from fishing. Since the slowdown in world air traffic, the export sector has slowed down: the best fish, reserved for the European and Asian markets, are sold on the local market. On one of Dakar's major fishing docks, fishermen and retailers are suffering the consequences of the surplus of fish and the measures implemented by the Senegalese government to fight against the coronavirus.
  • “We fish with the hope of better days”: the galley
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0230182.jpg
    a fisherman carries his cargo of fish in the port of Han.
    Over 17% of Senegalese people make a living from fishing. Since the slowdown in world air traffic, the export sector has slowed down: the best fish, reserved for the European and Asian markets, are sold on the local market. On one of Dakar's major fishing docks, fishermen and retailers are suffering the consequences of the surplus of fish and the measures implemented by the Senegalese government to fight against the coronavirus.
  • “We fish with the hope of better days”: the galley
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0230183.jpg
    "I will leave as soon as the sea is calmer to come back to sell other fish during Ramadan, because if I stay at home, I will have nothing to eat and I will have chances of catching the coronavirus", supports Souleymane Jules, captain on the pirogue who spent two weeks at sea.
    Over 17% of Senegalese people make a living from fishing. Since the slowdown in world air traffic, the export sector has slowed down: the best fish, reserved for the European and Asian markets, are sold on the local market. On one of Dakar's major fishing docks, fishermen and retailers are suffering the consequences of the surplus of fish and the measures implemented by the Senegalese government to fight against the coronavirus.
  • “We fish with the hope of better days”: the galley
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0230184.jpg
    Canoe owners take advantage of a slow period to repair their fleet, but renovations of the most important boats can cost up to “several thousand euros” according to Faly Sarr, ready to invest, “since this coronavirus crisis will be well finished, and we will be the first to go back to work ”.
    Over 17% of Senegalese people make a living from fishing. Since the slowdown in world air traffic, the export sector has slowed down: the best fish, reserved for the European and Asian markets, are sold on the local market. On one of Dakar's major fishing docks, fishermen and retailers are suffering the consequences of the surplus of fish and the measures implemented by the Senegalese government to fight against the coronavirus.
  • “We fish with the hope of better days”: the galley
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0230185.jpg
    "The wharves had been closed for almost a week to disinfect everything, and we have just opened them again to small-scale fishermen, but cleaning weekly to prevent the spread of the virus," said Abdoulaye Sy, one of the officials of the Harbor.
    Over 17% of Senegalese people make a living from fishing. Since the slowdown in world air traffic, the export sector has slowed down: the best fish, reserved for the European and Asian markets, are sold on the local market. On one of Dakar's major fishing docks, fishermen and retailers are suffering the consequences of the surplus of fish and the measures implemented by the Senegalese government to fight against the coronavirus.
  • “We fish with the hope of better days”: the galley
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0230186.jpg
    Two carriers impatiently wait for their trucks to be loaded with fish before leaving to deliver customers to the city before 8 p.m., after which time they are no longer authorized to travel by the authorities and risk a fine for violating the curfew.
    Over 17% of Senegalese people make a living from fishing. Since the slowdown in world air traffic, the export sector has slowed down: the best fish, reserved for the European and Asian markets, are sold on the local market. On one of Dakar's major fishing docks, fishermen and retailers are suffering the consequences of the surplus of fish and the measures implemented by the Senegalese government to fight against the coronavirus.
  • “We fish with the hope of better days”: the galley
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0230187.jpg
    "The disease still surprises us, but the Senegalese is resistant, it takes more to stop living and working. We are fishing with the hope of better days, ”said Faly Sarr, who is waiting for the return of his two sons, who have been at sea for eight days.
    Over 17% of Senegalese people make a living from fishing. Since the slowdown in world air traffic, the export sector has slowed down: the best fish, reserved for the European and Asian markets, are sold on the local market. On one of Dakar's major fishing docks, fishermen and retailers are suffering the consequences of the surplus of fish and the measures implemented by the Senegalese government to fight against the coronavirus.
  • “We fish with the hope of better days”: the galley
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0230188.jpg
    "My two sons have been at sea for eight days, but even if they bring back tons of fish, they will gain almost nothing," laments Faly Sarr, owner of a dozen canoes and head of the largest family of fishermen and resellers at the Hann wharf in Dakar.
    Over 17% of Senegalese people make a living from fishing. Since the slowdown in world air traffic, the export sector has slowed down: the best fish, reserved for the European and Asian markets, are sold on the local market. On one of Dakar's major fishing docks, fishermen and retailers are suffering the consequences of the surplus of fish and the measures implemented by the Senegalese government to fight against the coronavirus.
  • “We fish with the hope of better days”: the galley
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0230189.jpg
    "The prices have gone down and so have our margins, so I earn almost nothing every day, but I keep coming because it's my job," said Demba Gueye, one of the port's many wholesalers, active all day to sort and sell fish.
    Over 17% of Senegalese people make a living from fishing. Since the slowdown in world air traffic, the export sector has slowed down: the best fish, reserved for the European and Asian markets, are sold on the local market. On one of Dakar's major fishing docks, fishermen and retailers are suffering the consequences of the surplus of fish and the measures implemented by the Senegalese government to fight against the coronavirus.
  • “We fish with the hope of better days”: the galley
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0230190.jpg
    Fatou Ndour, 27, replaces her mother at the family fish sales stand, while the latter takes care of her sick brother: “We all come from far away to make a living here. But with the curfew at 8 p.m., I have to stay near the port, at my aunt's, because my house is an hour away by bus. ”
    Over 17% of Senegalese people make a living from fishing. Since the slowdown in world air traffic, the export sector has slowed down: the best fish, reserved for the European and Asian markets, are sold on the local market. On one of Dakar's major fishing docks, fishermen and retailers are suffering the consequences of the surplus of fish and the measures implemented by the Senegalese government to fight against the coronavirus.
  • “We fish with the hope of better days”: the galley
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0230191.jpg
    After sixteen days at sea without interruption, one of the fishermen of a large pirogue whose cargo is intended for export collapses in front of the quay dedicated to shipments to Europe, while waiting for the resellers to negotiate and inspect the taken.
    Over 17% of Senegalese people make a living from fishing. Since the slowdown in world air traffic, the export sector has slowed down: the best fish, reserved for the European and Asian markets, are sold on the local market. On one of Dakar's major fishing docks, fishermen and retailers are suffering the consequences of the surplus of fish and the measures implemented by the Senegalese government to fight against the coronavirus.
  • “We fish with the hope of better days”: the galley
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0230192.jpg
    "Negotiating with the wholesalers is too difficult at the moment, the prices are low and they are fighting for a small margin, so we sell at sums to which we have never sold", laments Malick Sy, a few minutes after his return two weeks at sea, spent on a large canoe with his brothers.
    Over 17% of Senegalese people make a living from fishing. Since the slowdown in world air traffic, the export sector has slowed down: the best fish, reserved for the European and Asian markets, are sold on the local market. On one of Dakar's major fishing docks, fishermen and retailers are suffering the consequences of the surplus of fish and the measures implemented by the Senegalese government to fight against the coronavirus.
  • “We fish with the hope of better days”: the galley
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0230193.jpg
    “Before, black cod could sell in factories up to 15,000 CFA francs per kilo - more than twenty euros, note - but now it's difficult to negotiate above 4,000 francs - about six euros - kilo on the local market ”, explains one of the port's wholesalers, who must resign themselves to selling.
    Over 17% of Senegalese people make a living from fishing. Since the slowdown in world air traffic, the export sector has slowed down: the best fish, reserved for the European and Asian markets, are sold on the local market. On one of Dakar's major fishing docks, fishermen and retailers are suffering the consequences of the surplus of fish and the measures implemented by the Senegalese government to fight against the coronavirus.
  • “We fish with the hope of better days”: the galley
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0230194.jpg
    Neither social distancing nor wearing masks are applied to the port of Hann, although they are recommended by the Senegalese government: "People eat together, shake hands and will never get used to the mask to work", explains Fatou Ndour.
    Over 17% of Senegalese people make a living from fishing. Since the slowdown in world air traffic, the export sector has slowed down: the best fish, reserved for the European and Asian markets, are sold on the local market. On one of Dakar's major fishing docks, fishermen and retailers are suffering the consequences of the surplus of fish and the measures implemented by the Senegalese government to fight against the coronavirus.
  • “We fish with the hope of better days”: the galley
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0230195.jpg
    Galaye Gueye is the head of an export company which sells directly to factories: “I employ 15 people in this part of the port and it is out of the question to send them home during the first days of Ramadan, since this is a very busy period for orders. We will continue, even if we earn less. ”
    Over 17% of Senegalese people make a living from fishing. Since the slowdown in world air traffic, the export sector has slowed down: the best fish, reserved for the European and Asian markets, are sold on the local market. On one of Dakar's major fishing docks, fishermen and retailers are suffering the consequences of the surplus of fish and the measures implemented by the Senegalese government to fight against the coronavirus.
  • racing motorcycles
    France
    Jan Schmidt-Whitley
    LePictorium_0190954.jpg
    Pictures of racing motorcycles and equipment related to motorcycling.
  • racing motorcycles
    France
    Jan Schmidt-Whitley
    LePictorium_0190955.jpg
    Pictures of racing motorcycles and equipment related to motorcycling.
  • racing motorcycles
    France
    Jan Schmidt-Whitley
    LePictorium_0190956.jpg
    Pictures of racing motorcycles and equipment related to motorcycling.
  • Nepal - Katmandou Valley. Visit of the businesses followed by the WOFOWON organisation.
    Nepal
    Noémie Repetto
    LePictorium_0173284.jpg
    Small businesses owned exclusively by women. The WOFOWON (Women Forum for Women in Nepal) is an NGO helping those people.
  • Syria: Ain Issa displaced people camp
    Syria
    Chris Huby
    LePictorium_0165797.jpg
    July 2017 - Syria - Rojava - Northern Syria - Ain Issa displaced people camp / Doctors Without Borders Clinic / A young Syrian boy displaced from Rakka has been burned by burning oil (according to his parents) when he was at home in Rakka.
  • Syria: Ain Issa displaced people camp
    Syria
    Chris Huby
    LePictorium_0165798.jpg
    July 2017 - Syria - Rojava - Northern Syria - Ain Issa displaced people camp / Doctors Without Borders Clinic / A young Syrian boy displaced from Rakka has been burned by burning oil (according to his parents) when he was at home in Rakka.
  • Life around the Alaotra lake, Madagascar
    Madagascar
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0151328.jpg
    Young man going to work in the fieds,
  • Life around the Alaotra lake, Madagascar
    Madagascar
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0151329.jpg
    Young man going to work in the fieds,
  • Around lake Alaotra, Madagascar
    Madagascar
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0150949.jpg
    Mlagasy farmer going to the fields.
  • Around lake Alaotra, Madagascar
    Madagascar
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0150942.jpg
    Kids chopping wood at dawn.
  • Around the Alaotra lake, Madagascar
    Madagascar
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0150661.jpg
    Taxibrousse driver fixing the radio.
  • Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso.
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0149338.jpg
    Brother Filipo in the workshop where the machines are. It is during the third year that the students learn how to use the electric machine tools.
    Here a student works on his own tools, he will leave the school with them as a token.

    Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso, close by the Alaotra lake, north of Tana, Madagascar.
  • Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso.
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0149351.jpg
    In the classroom, a lesson about hand planes...

    Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso, close by the Alaotra lake, north of Tana, Madagascar.
  • Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso.
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0149352.jpg
    In the classroom, a lesson about hand planes...

    Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso, close by the Alaotra lake, north of Tana, Madagascar.
  • Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso.
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0148877.jpg
    Ĩn the classroom. A lesson about screwdrivers!

    Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso, close by the Alaotra lake, north of Tana, Madagascar.
  • Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso.
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0149350.jpg
    In the classroom, a lesson about hand planes...

    Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso, close by the Alaotra lake, north of Tana, Madagascar.
  • Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso.
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0149325.jpg
    Tools for the students of the carpentry school.

    Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso, close by the Alaotra lake, north of Tana, Madagascar.
  • Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso.
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0149322.jpg
    In the carpentry school, saws for the students...

    Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso, close by the Alaotra lake, north of Tana, Madagascar.
  • Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso.
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0148860.jpg
    Some workers cut a tree and are sawing it into planks in the plantation close by the carpentry school of the Church.

    Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso, close by the Alaotra lake, north of Tana, Madagascar.
  • Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso.
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0148861.jpg
    Some workers cut a tree and are sawing it into planks in the plantation close by the carpentry school of the Church.

    Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso, close by the Alaotra lake, north of Tana, Madagascar.
  • Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso.
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0148862.jpg
    Some workers cut a tree and are sawing it into planks in the plantation close by the carpentry school of the Church.

    Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso, close by the Alaotra lake, north of Tana, Madagascar.
  • Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso.
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0148863.jpg
    Some workers cut a tree and are sawing it into planks in the plantation close by the carpentry school of the Church.

    Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso, close by the Alaotra lake, north of Tana, Madagascar.
  • Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso.
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0148864.jpg
    Some workers cut a tree and are sawing it into planks in the plantation close by the carpentry school of the Church.

    Frère Filipo, a dehonian brother who created a carpentry school in Imerimandroso, close by the Alaotra lake, north of Tana, Madagascar.
  • Oblast Arkhanglesk, in Russia...
    Russia
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0148799.jpg
    Loggers working in the woods. They are from a small company working "the old way" with chainsaw and spikes, without big logging machines.
  • Oblast Arkhanglesk, in Russia...
    Russia
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0148800.jpg
    Loggers working in the woods. They are from a small company working "the old way" with chainsaw and spikes, without big logging machines.
  • Oblast Arkhanglesk, in Russia...
    Russia
    Arnaud De Grave
    LePictorium_0148817.jpg
    Logging truck drivers smoke waiting before driving the load back to the sawmill. The tractor behind is still in use despite its advanced age.
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