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  • The fight for the dignity of sex workers in Senegal. Maison Close de Dakar at the time of Covid-19
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0234535.jpg
    Colette (first name has been changed), 38, has been receiving clients since 2009 in this small room in a popular district of Dakar.
    In a brothel in Dakar, four sex workers help each other through the ordeals, together. From morning to night, it is in two small rooms of an insanitary building that they receive their customers, share them and protect each other. Once back home, living in the same hallway, the four single mothers continue to stick together to support their families who do not know their real job. This solidarity is all the more important in these times of coronavirus when they are particularly precarious and exposed.
    One of them is even an "educator pair", and strives to raise awareness in her community. Fieldwork with the support of an association created in 2008 by a former prostitute, who has become a figure in the struggle for the rights of sex workers in Senegal. Strong in character, she stopped working in the streets to "protect the girls". Mediator for HIV prevention for years in the hospital, she preferred to resign to devote herself to the advocacy of her association, and to change the law to give more rights to sex workers.
  • The fight for the dignity of sex workers in Senegal. Maison Close de Dakar at the time of Covid-19
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0234536.jpg
    Fatoumata, 35, has been a prostitute since 2011 in Dakar, a brothel in the suburbs of Dakar.
    In a brothel in Dakar, four sex workers help each other through the ordeals, together. From morning to night, it is in two small rooms of an insanitary building that they receive their customers, share them and protect each other. Once back home, living in the same hallway, the four single mothers continue to stick together to support their families who do not know their real job. This solidarity is all the more important in these times of coronavirus when they are particularly precarious and exposed.
    One of them is even an "educator pair", and strives to raise awareness in her community. Fieldwork with the support of an association created in 2008 by a former prostitute, who has become a figure in the struggle for the rights of sex workers in Senegal. Strong in character, she stopped working in the streets to "protect the girls". Mediator for HIV prevention for years in the hospital, she preferred to resign to devote herself to the advocacy of her association, and to change the law to give more rights to sex workers.
  • The fight for the dignity of sex workers in Senegal. Maison Close de Dakar at the time of Covid-19
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0234537.jpg
    Fatoumata receives her clients in this small room in a popular district of Dakar, which she shares with three other sex workers.
    In a brothel in Dakar, four sex workers help each other through the ordeals, together. From morning to night, it is in two small rooms of an insanitary building that they receive their customers, share them and protect each other. Once back home, living in the same hallway, the four single mothers continue to stick together to support their families who do not know their real job. This solidarity is all the more important in these times of coronavirus when they are particularly precarious and exposed.
    One of them is even an "educator pair", and strives to raise awareness in her community. Fieldwork with the support of an association created in 2008 by a former prostitute, who has become a figure in the struggle for the rights of sex workers in Senegal. Strong in character, she stopped working in the streets to "protect the girls". Mediator for HIV prevention for years in the hospital, she preferred to resign to devote herself to the advocacy of her association, and to change the law to give more rights to sex workers.
  • The fight for the dignity of sex workers in Senegal. Maison Close de Dakar at the time of Covid-19
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0234538.jpg
    Aïsattou, 35-year-old sex worker in a popular district of Dakar.
    In a brothel in Dakar, four sex workers help each other through the ordeals, together. From morning to night, it is in two small rooms of an insanitary building that they receive their customers, share them and protect each other. Once back home, living in the same hallway, the four single mothers continue to stick together to support their families who do not know their real job. This solidarity is all the more important in these times of coronavirus when they are particularly precarious and exposed.
    One of them is even an "educator pair", and strives to raise awareness in her community. Fieldwork with the support of an association created in 2008 by a former prostitute, who has become a figure in the struggle for the rights of sex workers in Senegal. Strong in character, she stopped working in the streets to "protect the girls". Mediator for HIV prevention for years in the hospital, she preferred to resign to devote herself to the advocacy of her association, and to change the law to give more rights to sex workers.
  • The fight for the dignity of sex workers in Senegal. Maison Close de Dakar at the time of Covid-19
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0234539.jpg
    Fatoumata proudly shows the diploma received after training with the association And Soppeku.
    In a brothel in Dakar, four sex workers help each other through the ordeals, together. From morning to night, it is in two small rooms of an insanitary building that they receive their customers, share them and protect each other. Once back home, living in the same hallway, the four single mothers continue to stick together to support their families who do not know their real job. This solidarity is all the more important in these times of coronavirus when they are particularly precarious and exposed.
    One of them is even an "educator pair", and strives to raise awareness in her community. Fieldwork with the support of an association created in 2008 by a former prostitute, who has become a figure in the struggle for the rights of sex workers in Senegal. Strong in character, she stopped working in the streets to "protect the girls". Mediator for HIV prevention for years in the hospital, she preferred to resign to devote herself to the advocacy of her association, and to change the law to give more rights to sex workers.
  • The fight for the dignity of sex workers in Senegal. Maison Close de Dakar at the time of Covid-19
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0234540.jpg
    Colette sex worker on the roof of the brothel in Dakar.
    In a brothel in Dakar, four sex workers help each other through the ordeals, together. From morning to night, it is in two small rooms of an insanitary building that they receive their customers, share them and protect each other. Once back home, living in the same hallway, the four single mothers continue to stick together to support their families who do not know their real job. This solidarity is all the more important in these times of coronavirus when they are particularly precarious and exposed.
    One of them is even an "educator pair", and strives to raise awareness in her community. Fieldwork with the support of an association created in 2008 by a former prostitute, who has become a figure in the struggle for the rights of sex workers in Senegal. Strong in character, she stopped working in the streets to "protect the girls". Mediator for HIV prevention for years in the hospital, she preferred to resign to devote herself to the advocacy of her association, and to change the law to give more rights to sex workers.
  • The fight for the dignity of sex workers in Senegal. Maison Close de Dakar at the time of Covid-19
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0234541.jpg
    Their small room on the second floor in the brothel, the four women help each other pay for the room each month in the popular suburb of Dakar.
    In a brothel in Dakar, four sex workers help each other through the ordeals, together. From morning to night, it is in two small rooms of an insanitary building that they receive their customers, share them and protect each other. Once back home, living in the same hallway, the four single mothers continue to stick together to support their families who do not know their real job. This solidarity is all the more important in these times of coronavirus when they are particularly precarious and exposed.
    One of them is even an "educator pair", and strives to raise awareness in her community. Fieldwork with the support of an association created in 2008 by a former prostitute, who has become a figure in the struggle for the rights of sex workers in Senegal. Strong in character, she stopped working in the streets to "protect the girls". Mediator for HIV prevention for years in the hospital, she preferred to resign to devote herself to the advocacy of her association, and to change the law to give more rights to sex workers.
  • The fight for the dignity of sex workers in Senegal. Maison Close de Dakar at the time of Covid-19
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0234542.jpg
    Fatoumata looks out the window of the small room she rents with three other sex workers in a building in a popular district of Dakar.
    In a brothel in Dakar, four sex workers help each other through the ordeals, together. From morning to night, it is in two small rooms of an insanitary building that they receive their customers, share them and protect each other. Once back home, living in the same hallway, the four single mothers continue to stick together to support their families who do not know their real job. This solidarity is all the more important in these times of coronavirus when they are particularly precarious and exposed.
    One of them is even an "educator pair", and strives to raise awareness in her community. Fieldwork with the support of an association created in 2008 by a former prostitute, who has become a figure in the struggle for the rights of sex workers in Senegal. Strong in character, she stopped working in the streets to "protect the girls". Mediator for HIV prevention for years in the hospital, she preferred to resign to devote herself to the advocacy of her association, and to change the law to give more rights to sex workers.
  • The fight for the dignity of sex workers in Senegal. Maison Close de Dakar at the time of Covid-19
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0234543.jpg
    the health card allows sex workers to take HIV tests in centers dedicated to the holders of this card. It also allows in the event of a police check to prove the legality of their work.
    In a brothel in Dakar, four sex workers help each other through the ordeals, together. From morning to night, it is in two small rooms of an insanitary building that they receive their customers, share them and protect each other. Once back home, living in the same hallway, the four single mothers continue to stick together to support their families who do not know their real job. This solidarity is all the more important in these times of coronavirus when they are particularly precarious and exposed.
    One of them is even an "educator pair", and strives to raise awareness in her community. Fieldwork with the support of an association created in 2008 by a former prostitute, who has become a figure in the struggle for the rights of sex workers in Senegal. Strong in character, she stopped working in the streets to "protect the girls". Mediator for HIV prevention for years in the hospital, she preferred to resign to devote herself to the advocacy of her association, and to change the law to give more rights to sex workers.
  • The fight for the dignity of sex workers in Senegal. Maison Close de Dakar at the time of Covid-19
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0234544.jpg
    With two small phones in hand, Aïssatou manages her clients remotely. She "bought a chip at the start of the coronavirus crisis, because we can no longer look for customers in the evening in the street, nor in nightclubs or bars, all closed".
    In a brothel in Dakar, four sex workers help each other through the ordeals, together. From morning to night, it is in two small rooms of an insanitary building that they receive their customers, share them and protect each other. Once back home, living in the same hallway, the four single mothers continue to stick together to support their families who do not know their real job. This solidarity is all the more important in these times of coronavirus when they are particularly precarious and exposed.
    One of them is even an "educator pair", and strives to raise awareness in her community. Fieldwork with the support of an association created in 2008 by a former prostitute, who has become a figure in the struggle for the rights of sex workers in Senegal. Strong in character, she stopped working in the streets to "protect the girls". Mediator for HIV prevention for years in the hospital, she preferred to resign to devote herself to the advocacy of her association, and to change the law to give more rights to sex workers.
  • The fight for the dignity of sex workers in Senegal. Maison Close de Dakar at the time of Covid-19
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0234545.jpg
    Lala Maty Sow, former prostitute and president of the association And Soppeku, which she co-founded with colleagues in 2009.
    In a brothel in Dakar, four sex workers help each other through the ordeals, together. From morning to night, it is in two small rooms of an insanitary building that they receive their customers, share them and protect each other. Once back home, living in the same hallway, the four single mothers continue to stick together to support their families who do not know their real job. This solidarity is all the more important in these times of coronavirus when they are particularly precarious and exposed.
    One of them is even an "educator pair", and strives to raise awareness in her community. Fieldwork with the support of an association created in 2008 by a former prostitute, who has become a figure in the struggle for the rights of sex workers in Senegal. Strong in character, she stopped working in the streets to "protect the girls". Mediator for HIV prevention for years in the hospital, she preferred to resign to devote herself to the advocacy of her association, and to change the law to give more rights to sex workers.
  • The fight for the dignity of sex workers in Senegal. Maison Close de Dakar at the time of Covid-19
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0234546.jpg
    Scene of life in the corridors of a building where the inhabitants and the sex workers cross paths every day in a certain indifference.
    In a brothel in Dakar, four sex workers help each other through the ordeals, together. From morning to night, it is in two small rooms of an insanitary building that they receive their customers, share them and protect each other. Once back home, living in the same hallway, the four single mothers continue to stick together to support their families who do not know their real job. This solidarity is all the more important in these times of coronavirus when they are particularly precarious and exposed.
    One of them is even an "educator pair", and strives to raise awareness in her community. Fieldwork with the support of an association created in 2008 by a former prostitute, who has become a figure in the struggle for the rights of sex workers in Senegal. Strong in character, she stopped working in the streets to "protect the girls". Mediator for HIV prevention for years in the hospital, she preferred to resign to devote herself to the advocacy of her association, and to change the law to give more rights to sex workers.
  • The fight for the dignity of sex workers in Senegal. Maison Close de Dakar at the time of Covid-19
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0234547.jpg
    Fatoumata and these children share a traditional dish, thiéboudiène, a few steps from a friend's room where she performs sex work discreetly.
    In a brothel in Dakar, four sex workers help each other through the ordeals, together. From morning to night, it is in two small rooms of an insanitary building that they receive their customers, share them and protect each other. Once back home, living in the same hallway, the four single mothers continue to stick together to support their families who do not know their real job. This solidarity is all the more important in these times of coronavirus when they are particularly precarious and exposed.
    One of them is even an "educator pair", and strives to raise awareness in her community. Fieldwork with the support of an association created in 2008 by a former prostitute, who has become a figure in the struggle for the rights of sex workers in Senegal. Strong in character, she stopped working in the streets to "protect the girls". Mediator for HIV prevention for years in the hospital, she preferred to resign to devote herself to the advocacy of her association, and to change the law to give more rights to sex workers.
  • The fight for the dignity of sex workers in Senegal. Maison Close de Dakar at the time of Covid-19
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0234548.jpg
    Fatoumata looks at the horizon from the roof of her building where she lives with her children in a popular district of Dakar.
    In a brothel in Dakar, four sex workers help each other through the ordeals, together. From morning to night, it is in two small rooms of an insanitary building that they receive their customers, share them and protect each other. Once back home, living in the same hallway, the four single mothers continue to stick together to support their families who do not know their real job. This solidarity is all the more important in these times of coronavirus when they are particularly precarious and exposed.
    One of them is even an "educator pair", and strives to raise awareness in her community. Fieldwork with the support of an association created in 2008 by a former prostitute, who has become a figure in the struggle for the rights of sex workers in Senegal. Strong in character, she stopped working in the streets to "protect the girls". Mediator for HIV prevention for years in the hospital, she preferred to resign to devote herself to the advocacy of her association, and to change the law to give more rights to sex workers.
  • The fight for the dignity of sex workers in Senegal. Maison Close de Dakar at the time of Covid-19
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0234549.jpg
    Fatoumata is waiting for her future client at the foot of the bedroom door.
    In a brothel in Dakar, four sex workers help each other through the ordeals, together. From morning to night, it is in two small rooms of an insanitary building that they receive their customers, share them and protect each other. Once back home, living in the same hallway, the four single mothers continue to stick together to support their families who do not know their real job. This solidarity is all the more important in these times of coronavirus when they are particularly precarious and exposed.
    One of them is even an "educator pair", and strives to raise awareness in her community. Fieldwork with the support of an association created in 2008 by a former prostitute, who has become a figure in the struggle for the rights of sex workers in Senegal. Strong in character, she stopped working in the streets to "protect the girls". Mediator for HIV prevention for years in the hospital, she preferred to resign to devote herself to the advocacy of her association, and to change the law to give more rights to sex workers.
  • Touba, the Muslim brotherhood of the Mourides
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232848.jpg
    a mouride prays in The Great Mosque of Touba, it is the most important building in the city of Touba in Senegal, the largest mosque in the country as well and one of the largest mosques in Africa.
  • Touba, the Muslim brotherhood of the Mourides
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232849.jpg
    Two Mourides cross the center of the Great Mosque of Touba.
  • Touba, the Muslim brotherhood of the Mourides
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232850.jpg
    a Murid child learns the Koran in the Great Mosque of Touba.
  • Touba, the Muslim brotherhood of the Mourides
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232851.jpg
    The great prayer hall of the Great Mosque of Touba.
  • Touba, the Muslim brotherhood of the Mourides
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232852.jpg
    the marabout of Sheikh Ahmad Moustapha Mbacké reads the Koran with his faithful
  • Touba, the Muslim brotherhood of the Mourides
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232853.jpg
    The entrance to the place of worship of the Mourides where the history of the Mourides can be found in the town of Diourbel
  • Touba, the Muslim brotherhood of the Mourides
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232854.jpg
    The mosque has 4 minarets 66 meters high placed at the corners of the building, a fifth of 86.80 meters and is surmounted by large domes. In 2013 the caliph Serigne Sidy Moukhtar Mbacke added 2 minarets. These minarets can be seen up to 10 km from Touba, the tallest of the minarets is called Lamp Fall in homage to Sheikh Ibrahima Fall.
  • Touba, the Muslim brotherhood of the Mourides
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232855.jpg
    A woman and her children pray in front of the tomb of Sheikh Mouhamadou Moustapha Mbacké in the Grand Mosque of Touba.
  • Touba, the Muslim brotherhood of the Mourides
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232856.jpg
    Moustapha Mbacké is a Mourid philosopher and writer in his house in Touba.
  • Touba, the Muslim brotherhood of the Mourides
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232857.jpg
    Mourid women walk to pray in the great mosque of Touba.
  • Touba, the Muslim brotherhood of the Mourides
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232858.jpg
    a mouride in front of the Great Mosque See Diourbel.
  • Touba, the Muslim brotherhood of the Mourides
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232859.jpg
    Mourides walk on the sacred sands of the house of Sheikh Mouhamadou Moustapha Mbacké
  • The Belvédère-Sébikotane ecovillage
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232811.jpg
    Senegal loses 40,000 hectares of forests per year. To remedy this, the country is part of the international project of the Great Green Wall in the Sahel. In this dynamic of reforestation, a new project has just been launched, the "tolou keur", or small nourishing and medicinal forests, replanted next to villages with an ecological vocation. A second pilot project was launched on Wednesday August 12 in the village of Belvédère, 40 kilometers from Dakar. Portrait of Djibril Sall, the village chief
  • The Belvédère-Sébikotane ecovillage
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232812.jpg
    With the participation of the 60 people of the village, the Senegalese agency for Reforestation and the Great Green Wall has planted a nourishing forest of 5000 m², a few steps from their houses.
  • The Belvédère-Sébikotane ecovillage
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232813.jpg
    In Senegal, in Belvédère, nourishing forests are emerging as part of the Great Green Wall project. The goal is to fight against deforestation.
  • The Belvédère-Sébikotane ecovillage
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232814.jpg
    A farmer from the village of Belvédère feeds his oxen.
  • The Belvédère-Sébikotane ecovillage
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232815.jpg
    the reforestation agency wanted to help this village without water and electricity to become more autonomous, in an ecological way.
  • The Belvédère-Sébikotane ecovillage
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232816.jpg
    a child from the village of Belvédère collects kindling to make a fire.
  • The Belvédère-Sébikotane ecovillage
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232817.jpg
    Aly Ndiaye, project manager of the Belvédère village project.
  • The Belvédère-Sébikotane ecovillage
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232818.jpg
    Aly Ndiaye, project manager of the Belvédère village project.
  • The Belvédère-Sébikotane ecovillage
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232819.jpg
    Villagers cross an old dried up stream near the village of Belvédère.
  • The Belvédère-Sébikotane ecovillage
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232820.jpg
    Notables from the region visit the fruit tree plantations of the association "tolou keur" in the village of Belvédère.
  • The Belvédère-Sébikotane ecovillage
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232821.jpg
    Omar and his daughter pose in front of an old sign from an ecovillage mission in the 90s.
  • The Belvédère-Sébikotane ecovillage
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232822.jpg
    Djibril Sall, the village chief explains how irrigation works in the village.
  • The Belvédère-Sébikotane ecovillage
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232823.jpg
    There are over 60 people living in the village without water or electricity.
  • The Belvédère-Sébikotane ecovillage
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232824.jpg
    Fruit tree plantations can produce more than 2 tons of fruits and vegetables in 3 months.
  • The Belvédère-Sébikotane ecovillage
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232825.jpg
    The volunteers plant the fruit trees near the village of Belvédère.
  • The Belvédère-Sébikotane ecovillage
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232826.jpg
    A village woman walks through the fields of medicinal plants.
  • The Belvédère-Sébikotane ecovillage
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232827.jpg
    The artificial lake in the village of Belvédère.
  • Destruction of the Sandaga market
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232768.jpg
    Heavy construction machinery destroyed a large part of the famous Sandaga market, the heart of the informal economy in the heart of the Senegalese capital, so that it could be rebuilt and modernized. Photo: the entrance to the Sandaga market in Dakar.
  • Destruction of the Sandaga market
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232769.jpg
    The Great Hall, a Sudano-Sahelian architectural building built in 1933 where hundreds of stalls offered all kinds of products, from food to crafts, had already been closed in 2013 for safety reasons, its structures having been particularly weakened by several fires. during the destruction of the Sandaga market.
  • Destruction of the Sandaga market
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232770.jpg
    Most of them, who wildly occupied the road, -are settling in the Champ de course-, in a less central district of the capital, where some 500 stalls are to accommodate them during the works, which are to last two years during of the destruction of the Sandaga market.
  • Destruction of the Sandaga market
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232771.jpg
    An iconic market on the edge of the old colonial quarter and more popular areas, Sandaga was for nearly a century one of the main centers of commerce in Dakar. during the destruction of the Sandaga market.
  • Destruction of the Sandaga market
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232772.jpg
    a man destroyed has the mass of the walls of the market on the ground. during the destruction of the Sandaga market.
  • Destruction of the Sandaga market
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232773.jpg
    On the ground some objects from the sandaga market, such as this bust of a mannequin in the foreground. during the destruction of the Sandaga market.
  • Destruction of the Sandaga market
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232774.jpg
    An old entrance to the Sandaga market destroyed by heavy construction machinery. during the destruction of the Sandaga market.
  • Destruction of the Sandaga market
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232775.jpg
    Several people came to collect by hand various objects abandoned by traders during the destruction of the Sandaga market.
  • Destruction of the Sandaga market
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232776.jpg
    Dozens of makeshift shops have been destroyed around the Sandaga Market. When the Sandaga market was destroyed
  • Destruction of the Sandaga market
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232777.jpg
    Several square meters of garbage have piled up in the Sandaga market. When the Sandaga market was destroyed
  • Destruction of the Sandaga market
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232778.jpg
    Workers pick up rubble, beams and corrugated iron sheets in front of the Sandaga Market. When the Sandaga market was destroyed
  • Destruction of the Sandaga market
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232779.jpg
    Heavy construction machinery destroyed a large part of the famous Sandaga market, the heart of the informal economy in the heart of the Senegalese capital, so that it could be rebuilt and modernized. Photo: the entrance to the Sandaga market in Dakar.
  • Destruction of the Sandaga market
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232780.jpg
    Heavy construction machinery destroyed a large part of the famous Sandaga market, the heart of the informal economy in the heart of the Senegalese capital, so that it could be rebuilt and modernized. Photo: the entrance to the Sandaga market in Dakar.
  • COVID-19 in Dakar
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232408.jpg
    The Taaral Tefess association organized this Sunday, July 19, the collection of various waste near the mosque of the deity in the locality of Ouakam. The goal is to prevent covid-19 and to raise public awareness of waste potentially carrying the coronavirus thrown in public places. These actions will be carried out in several districts of Dakar.
  • COVID-19 in Dakar
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232409.jpg
    The Taaral Tefess association organized this Sunday, July 19, the collection of various waste near the mosque of the deity in the locality of Ouakam. The goal is to prevent covid-19 and to raise public awareness of waste potentially carrying the coronavirus thrown in public places. These actions will be carried out in several districts of Dakar.
  • COVID-19 in Dakar
    Senegal
    Sadak Souici
    LePictorium_0232410.jpg
    The Taaral Tefess association organized this Sunday, July 19, the collection of various waste near the mosque of the deity in the locality of Ouakam. The goal is to prevent covid-19 and to raise public awareness of waste potentially carrying the coronavirus thrown in public places. These actions will be carried out in several districts of Dakar.
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