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  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217236.jpg
    People gathered at Sassine Square watch the speech of Lebanese President Michel Aoun live. October 24, 2019. The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217237.jpg
    People gathered at Sassine Square watch the speech of Lebanese President Michel Aoun live. October 24, 2019. The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217238.jpg
    People gathered at Sassine Square watch the speech of Lebanese President Michel Aoun live. October 24, 2019. The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217239.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217240.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217241.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217242.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217243.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217244.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217245.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217246.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217247.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217248.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217249.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217250.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217251.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217252.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217253.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217254.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217255.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217256.jpg
    Statute of Saint Charbel, with the portrait of Bachir Gemayel behind. the flowers were deposited by police officers a few moments earlier. The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217257.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217258.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217259.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217260.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217261.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217262.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
  • Demonstration in Beirut
    Lebanon
    Bilal Tarabey
    LePictorium_0217263.jpg
    The Lebanese revolution has been going on for a week now. Place Sassine is one if not THE stronghold of Christians in Beirut, even identity Christians: the members of the Kataeb party (Christian Phalanges) and Ouet (Lebanese Forces). In the square stands a sculpture and a giant photo of former President Bachir Gemayel, founder and head of the Christian Phalanges and President of the Republic for three weeks in 1982 before being murdered by pro-Syrian nationalists. Martyr for some (most people in Sassine Square and many Lebanese Christians), war criminal for others - leftists, Palestinians and Muslims. All the Christians present here support the revolution. their willingness to see the creation of a secular state is, on the other hand, variable - because many people are afraid of Hezbollah. The neighborhood around Place Sassine, Achrafieh, may be bourgeois, but there is still a lot of hidden poverty, especially single women, elderly people, who survive through family solidarity mechanisms. Poverty is one of the reasons they are fed up too. There is also a statue of Saint Charbel, the patron saint of Maronite Christians, the majority community among Lebanese Christians, from which the President of the Republic is always descended.
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